Last edited by Akirisar
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

3 edition of Assessment of potential radiological health effects from radon in natural gas found in the catalog.

Assessment of potential radiological health effects from radon in natural gas

Raymond H. Johnson

Assessment of potential radiological health effects from radon in natural gas

by Raymond H. Johnson

  • 112 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by United States. Environmental Protection Agency, Radiation Programs Office in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radon -- Physiological effect.,
  • Radiation -- Safety measures.,
  • Natural gas -- Physiological effect.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRaymond H. Johnson, Jr.... [et al.]. --
    SeriesEPA-520/1-73-004
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 60p. :
    Number of Pages60
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14115897M

    Assessment of Potential Radiological Health Effects from Radon in Natural Gas. EPA/, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation Programs, Washington, D.C. 60 . Radon Group are still operating (while complying with social distancing guidelines). If you have radon detectors that are due for return and are able to return them safely, please continue to do so. Alternatively, radon detectors record reliably for up to 12 months, so please keep them in position until you are able to safely send them back to us.

    Breathing radon does not cause any short-term health effects such as shortness of breath, coughing, headaches, or fever. In , the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) released the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VI) Report, "The Health Effects of Exposure to Indoor Radon." The study reviewed and evaluated data from many prior. Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless noble gas, occurring naturally as the decay product of isotopes of radon are radioactive, but the two radon isotopes radon and radon are very important from radiation protection point of view.. Source: JANIS (Java-based Nuclear Data Information Software); ENDF/B-VII RadonThe radon isotope is a natural decay product .

      It has been known for about years that radon occurs in natural gas (van der Heijde); and the potential health impacts of this occurrence have been investigated by severalauthors, including a major study by the U.S. EPA (Johnson et al. ). The EPA studyestimated that the overall average concentration of radon at the wellhead is 37 pCi/L. Assessment of potential radiological health effects from radon in natural gas / Raymond H. Johnson, Jr. [et al.].


Share this book
You might also like
The Ixl Museum Notebook

The Ixl Museum Notebook

Marketing manual for the Wisconsin Urban Transit Association

Marketing manual for the Wisconsin Urban Transit Association

English for the Young School Leaver (Central Committee on English Bulletin)

English for the Young School Leaver (Central Committee on English Bulletin)

Tell Someone

Tell Someone

Special Drug Squad

Special Drug Squad

Logic for living

Logic for living

laboratory guide in virology.

laboratory guide in virology.

Life of Albrecht Durer of Nurnberg

Life of Albrecht Durer of Nurnberg

Radiation dosimetry

Radiation dosimetry

velocity of light.

velocity of light.

electors scrap book; or, a complete collection of the addresses, speeches, and squibs, during the contested election for the borough ofSouth Shields

electors scrap book; or, a complete collection of the addresses, speeches, and squibs, during the contested election for the borough ofSouth Shields

Prevention of healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care

Prevention of healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care

Assessment of potential radiological health effects from radon in natural gas by Raymond H. Johnson Download PDF EPUB FB2

CONCLUSIONS The conclusions that can be drawn from this evaluation of potential radiological health effects from radon in natural gas are as follows: (a) The use of natural gas containing radon for average exposure conditions does not contribute significantly to lung cancer deaths in.

Assessment of potential radiological health effects from radon in natural gas. Washington: United States. Environmental Protection Agency, Radiation Programs Office, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors.

Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas Paperback – January 1, by Thomas F. Gesell (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsAuthor: Thomas F. Gesell. @article{osti_, title = {Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas}, author = {Gesell, T F and Johnson, Jr, R H and Bernhardt, D E}, abstractNote = {Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contains varying amounts of radon which becomes dispersed within homes when LPG is used in unvented appliances.

Radon decays to alpha. CONCLUSIONS The conclusions from this assessment of potential radiological health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas are summarized as follows: (a) The use of LPG containing radon in average homes with unvented kitchen ranges and space heaters does not contribute to lung cancer incidence in the United States.

Purpose: Radon is natural radioactive noble gas that can be found in soil, water, outdoor and indoor air. Exposure to radon accounts for more that 50% of the annual effective dose of natural.

To estimate the health effects of radon in natural gas three factors must be addressed. One, the concentration of radon at the natural gas wellhead. Two, transport from the wellhead to the household.

And, three, the dilution of incoming radon in the home. The first step is to calculate the initial source term, the concentration of radon at the. Johnson RH, Bernhardt DE, Nelson NS, Calley HW () Assessment of potential radiological health effects from radon in natural gas, environmental protection agency (EPA) Google Scholar 7.

Gogolak CV () Review of Rn in natural gas produced from unconventional sources, environmental measurements laboratory, United States. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) are present in human radiation environment.

In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to radon, which is a natural, colorless, odorless, and tasteless radioactive noble gas.

Three are the main naturally occurring isotopes of radon, Rn, Rn, and Rn. Elevated levels of radon in homes were not recognized as a potential public health threat until the mid’s. Stanley Watras, a worker at the Limerick Nuclear Power Plant located in eastern Pennsylvania, set off a radiation detector upon entering the nuclear power plant.

Radon gas can damage cells in your lungs, which can lead to cancer. Radon is responsible for ab lung cancer deaths each year in the United States, though it usually takes 5 to 25 years to.

Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas. Washington: Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation Programs, (OCoLC) A smoker who is also exposed to radon has a much higher risk of lung cancer.

Radon is the number one cause of lung cancer among non-smokers, according to EPA estimates. Overall, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Radon is responsible for.

When you breathe in radon, it gets into the lining of your lungs and gives off radiation. Over a long time, that can damage the cells there and lead to lung cancer. Radon is the second biggest. Health Effects of Radon High radon exposure is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer.

Radon is a noble gas (reactive compound), and is quickly exhaled after being breathed in. Radon progeny (decayed products) combined with other air molecules, such as dust particles and smoke, can be deposited in the airway of the lungs and become. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk.

The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model was used to measure the radon concentration emanates. Radon is a colorless, odorless radioactive gas. It comes from the natural decay of uranium or thorium found in nearly all soils.

It typically moves up through the ground and into the home through cracks in floors, walls and foundations. It can also be. HEALTH EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO RADON Radon is a carcinogen designated by the World Health Organization and is the second-leading cause of lung cancer following smoking.

The results showed that radon concentration was significantly higher in dwellings supplied with natural gas, where it was versus Bqm-3 in dwelling not supplied with natural gas (P.

Radon produces a radioactive dust in the air we breathe. The dust is trapped in our airways and emits radiation that damages the inside of our lungs.

This damage, like the damage caused by smoking, increases our risk of lung cancer. How can I reduce my risk?. Radiation exposure from radon is indirect.

The health hazard from radon does not come primarily from radon itself, but rather from the radioactive products formed in the decay of radon. The general effects of radon to the human body are caused by its radioactivity and consequent risk of radiation-induced cancer.

Lung cancer is the only observed consequence of high concentration radon exposures; both human .Assessment of Potential Radiological Health Effects from Radon in Natural Gas U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Creator) Published by BiblioGov ().naturally occurring radiation is from indoor radon.

Since radon gas emits alpha. particles, inhaling it can cause cancer. Radon can seep into buildings from the ground through cracks and other openings in floors or walls. Accumulated radon in buildings can pose a health hazard.

Radon causes an estima lung cancer deaths each year. The.